Grey skies

I find spending time in building with grey walls incredibly depressing.  Grey and stark white just make me want to leave.  So many houses are now being decorated with these colors for sale and I would pay less for any house decorated extensively in these tones.

Now, I am going to be contrary for a second.  While nine times out of ten the shades of grey could be described as "stark grey-white", "mausoleum grey" and "tomb charcoal" some clever interior types do manage to use grey and make a room sing.

Most of the population think they can paint grey and black on the walls, add a few subway tiles and they are post modern and adding value to their home.  Grey and subway tiles will instantly date a house because they are so popular.

Grey used sparingly, with the perfect tone, and splashes of colors like yellow, pink and deep aqua  can work.  It's the rare person that can pull off grey. Generally grey and white show every speck of dirt and can make a house feel cold.

Check out this article on the use of grey in interiors - it can be spectacularly good, or spectacularly bad and looking around at local housing, it's generally bad:

http://www.dreamhomedecorating.com/psychological-effects-color-gray.html

This is a bit of fun to read:

http://business.tutsplus.com/articles/color-psychology-what-color-says-about-you--fsw-29098

Something a little more scientific:

https://www.helpscout.net/blog/psychology-of-color/

Personally, I think warm natural neutrals are a better bet for interiors.  Even off white and timber with the odd splash of green to sell a house is almost impossible to muck up.  Grey is a difficult color to get right.  While I acknowledge that everyone has different color preferences, grey walls are a big no, no for me when looking at property, including property I am thinking about renovating.  Instead of subway tiles?  Classic square tiles with an accent tile or two.

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